And Ye Shall Walk in Silk Attire
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Lesley Nelson-Burns


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The words to this song were written by Miss Susanna Blamire (1747-1794). The music is by Sir Henry Rowley Bishop (1786-1855).

Susanna Blamire ("The Muse of Cumberland") was born at Thackwood-nook in the parish of Sowerby in Cumberland. The ballad is also known as The Siller Crown and was originally published as a single sheet broadside by Napier, with the author and composer listed as unknown. There are several different verses, these are as they appear in the Scottish Orpheus (circa 1921).

Bishop is best known as a composer of light operas. He also wrote musical pieces for various plays and arranged operas by well-known composers. Bishop was born in London in 1786. He was trained by Francesco Bianchi. At the age of eighteen he wrote Angelina and in 1806 he wrote Tamarlan and Bajezet which was produced at the King's Theatre. In 1810 he was employed by Covent Garden for three years as composer and director. He later conducted music at King's Theatre, Haymarket (1816-17), Drury Lane (from 1825), and Vauxhall Gardens (1830). He became professor of music at the Universities of Edinburgh (1841) and Oxford (1848). In 1842 he was knighted. He was one of the original members of the Philharmonic Society. Bishop is remembered today for his songs Home, Sweet Home and Lo, Here the Gentle Lark.

And ye shall walk in silk attire,
And siller ha'e to spare,
Gin ye'll consent to be his bride;
Nor think o' Donald mair.
Oh! wha wad buy a silken gown,
Wi' a poor broken heart?
Or what's to me a siller crown,
Gin frae my love I part.
And ye shall walk in silk attire
And siller ha'e to spare,
Gin ye'll consent to be his bride,
Nor think o' Donald mair.


I wouldna walk in silk attire,
Nor braid wi' gems my hair.
Gin he whose faith is pledge wi' mine.
Were wrang'd and grieving sair.
Frae infancy he lo'ed me still.
And still my heart shall prove.
How weel it can those vows fulfill,
Which first repaid is love.
I wouldna walk in silk attire,
Nor braid wi' gems my hair.
Gin he whose faith is pledge wi' mine.
Were wrang'd and grieving sair.

Related Links
From Scottish Orpheus and
One Hundred Songs of England
See Bibliography for full information.