The Soldier's Farewell
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Lesley Nelson-Burns


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Lyrics
This appears in Dixon's Ballads of the Peasantry (1841).

The white cockade was the symbol of Bonnie Prince Charlie's followers in the uprising of 1745/46.

It was one Monday morning
I march'd o'er the moss,
I never thought of 'listing
Till the soldiers did me cross;
They kindly did invite me
To pledge the ale so brown,
They advanced me some money -
Ten guineas and a crown.
They advanced me some money,
They advanced me some money,
They advanced me some money,
Ten guineas and a crown.


Then, as I wore the white cockade,
I marched into the town
To bid farewell to al my friends
Before I did go down.
Beneath the shady willow
I saw my sweetheart lay
Upon a mossy pillow
And heard her sighing say,
Upon a mossy pillow
Upon a mossy pillow
Upon a mossy pillow
And heard her sighing say,


'Tis my true love is 'listed,
And he wears the white cockade,
He is a handsome young man,
He is gone to serve the king,
My very heart is breaking
All for the love of him.
My very heart is breaking
My very heart is breaking
My very heart is breaking
All for the love of him.


Oh! may he never prosper,
Oh! may he never thrive,
Nor anything he takes in hand
As long as he's alive;
May the ground he treads fall under him,
The grass he bends ne'er grow,
Since he has gone and left me
In sorrow, grief, and woe.
Since he has gone and left me
Since he has gone and left me
Since he has gone and left me
In sorrow, grief and woe.


I pulled out my handkerchief
And wiped her flowing tears,
O, take this in remembrance
And calm your groundless fears,
And keep you in good company
While I march o'er the plain,
Then I'll be married to my love
When I return again.
Then I'll be married to my love
Then I'll be married to my love
Then I'll be married to my love
When I return again.


Related Links
From English Folk-Songs
See Bibliography for full information.